Wellbeing, resilience and delivering change

We co-hosted a cracking session on wellbeing, resilience and change with the Association of Project Management (APM) last week. This was a hands-on session with an opportunity for the 25 attendees to hear from change consultant and CIPR Fellow Jo Twiselton before splitting into groups to discuss recent experiences of managing the changes to our working lives since the start of the pandemic. The third in a series of webinars we’ve been running with the APM, this was another lively event with both CIPR and APM members benefitting from the shared learning and networking. Read CIPR E Anglia committee member Nic Wray’s blog post on the event:

The old saying is “there are no certainties in life, except death and taxes” but to that, I’ve always said there should be a third – change. As Take That sang, “Everything Changes.” Looking back at last year’s diary, I was catching a train to an event 170 miles away from home, my partner was flying to Berlin for his own meetings and today, those same gatherings are being held virtually, as offices are deserted, schools are closed, and hospitals at bursting point due to a virus only the most diligent of news followers had even heard of.

A pandemic is an extreme example of change thrust upon us. Any change out of our direct control can be uncomfortable at best, and actively harmful to our wellbeing at worst, and I’m sure we are all aware of people at various stages on that spectrum as they deal with the current situation. But what about changes we can control? How do we ensure the wellbeing of our organisation, teams and ourselves as we deliver change – large or small – in our professional lives?

Why do wellbeing and resilience matter?

This was the topic of the latest in the series of joint learning events hosted by CIPR East Anglia and the Association of Project Management (APM). Members of the two organisations from a wide range of industries and backgrounds came together to understand why wellbeing and resilience matter in any project involving change, how to help teams improve their wellbeing and resilience and how we can work together to build these qualities into teams.

Jo Twiselton (Twist Consultants) is a consultant specialising in change. She outlined definitions of wellbeing – which can flex from day to day – and resilience. Resilience isn’t just the ability to bounce back, but the capacity to adapt whilst maintaining stable mental wellbeing.  The Health and Safety Executive recognise that change is one of six key stressors and that the way change is managed can be a barrier – or enabler – to wellbeing.

Jo advocates for a people approach to change, and introduced us to Fisher’s Personal Transition Curve, which shows the stages someone goes through when faced with change – but everyone’s curve will be individual.

Jo then suggested some questions to consider at each level – organisational, team and individual – when delivering change, before we broke into smaller groups to discuss and share our own experiences and learning.

Sharing learning

This was a very valuable part of the evening – both in the small groups and when we came back together – because so many of the challenges of change regardless of role, or industry. It was good to acknowledge that even though wellbeing isn’t formally built into many change plans (yet – after the session, I think that will change!) that wellbeing and resilience activities are happening, and that people do think that they are important.

I know I can’t stop change – and that I may myself be responsible for introducing uncomfortable change for others.  However, I now feel more confident that by using my skills to deliver authentic, clear and compassionate communications and building wellbeing and resilience measures into my plans, any change can be implemented and managed effectively so that not only the needs of our organisation are met, but also those of our people.

Photo by Nothing Ahead from Pexels

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